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QuarkCoin Cryptocurrency

Quark is a decentralized digital monetary system. It facilitates sending Quarks to Friends, Family Members Online Payments free of charges and charge-backs. Military Grade Encryption. No Bank or Government Control. Quark coins are based on the original idea of Bitcoin but improved, more secure, faster transaction times and zero fees. With improvements to design and security. There is also a greater coin supply with higher block rewards for miners. Quark is fully Open Source.
[link]

How do I get my zero confirmation balance with the Bitcoin-qt command line?

No matter what I try I can't seem to get the balance with zero confirmations. The default is 1 confirmation. This is from the documentation:
.>bitcoind help getbalance
getbalance [account] [minconf=1] If [account] is not specified, returns the server's total available balance. If [account] is specified, returns the balance in the account.
These do not work:
(my balance is not 0)
.>bitcoind getbalance '*' 0
0.00000000
.>bitcoind getbalance * 0
error: type mismatch
.>bitcoind getbalance "*" 0
error: type mismatch
.>bitcoind getbalance [*] 0
0.00000000
Any ideas? This is driving me nuts.
submitted by RockyMountainHigh to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hash Time Locked Contract (HTLC) using bitcoin-qt

Is it possible to manually create a Hash Time Locked Contract using the bitcoin-qt command line?
I have dabbled with manually creating createrawtransaction/sendrawtransaction using the bitcoin-qt clients command line, and wanted to know how to manually create a Hash Time Locked Contract.
When I say "manually", I mean, really getting your hands dirty, like using notepad to construct the contract, putting the values into bitcoin-cli, to convert it into a hash, ready for it to be sent using sendrawtransaction.
submitted by h259474 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Hash Time Locked Contract (HTLC) using bitcoin-qt

Is it possible to manually create a Hash Time Locked Contract using the bitcoin-qt command line?
I have dabbled with manually creating createrawtransaction/sendrawtransaction using the bitcoin-qt clients command line, and wanted to know how to manually create a Hash Time Locked Contract.
When I say "manually", I mean, really getting your hands dirty, like using notepad to construct the contract, putting the values into bitcoin-cli, to convert it into a hash, ready for it to be sent using sendrawtransaction.
submitted by h259474 to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

Learning-Bitcoin-from-the-Command-Line Guide - The best way to learn to learn deeply about bitcoin is to avoid GUIs (even bitcoin-qt), and instead learn it from the command line

Learning-Bitcoin-from-the-Command-Line Guide - The best way to learn to learn deeply about bitcoin is to avoid GUIs (even bitcoin-qt), and instead learn it from the command line submitted by parakite to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I start bitcoin-qt from the command line, and when I exit the qt gui, I often have to ctrl-c to fully close the program

Does that happen to anyone else?
submitted by lemkenski to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What’s the difference between Bitcoin-Qt and Bitcoin Core?

submitted by jefferson_willson_ to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.
ColdCard also has a utility called ckcc that will do the sign operation instead of HWI, but in many ways they are interchangeable. KeepKey and Ledger both have libraries for scripted signing but no one-shot, one-line console apps that I know of. But HWI and Electrum of course work on all four.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Gridcoin 5.0.0.0-Mandatory "Fern" Release

https://github.com/gridcoin-community/Gridcoin-Research/releases/tag/5.0.0.0
Finally! After over ten months of development and testing, "Fern" has arrived! This is a whopper. 240 pull requests merged. Essentially a complete rewrite that was started with the scraper (the "neural net" rewrite) in "Denise" has now been completed. Practically the ENTIRE Gridcoin specific codebase resting on top of the vanilla Bitcoin/Peercoin/Blackcoin vanilla PoS code has been rewritten. This removes the team requirement at last (see below), although there are many other important improvements besides that.
Fern was a monumental undertaking. We had to encode all of the old rules active for the v10 block protocol in new code and ensure that the new code was 100% compatible. This had to be done in such a way as to clear out all of the old spaghetti and ring-fence it with tightly controlled class implementations. We then wrote an entirely new, simplified ruleset for research rewards and reengineered contracts (which includes beacon management, polls, and voting) using properly classed code. The fundamentals of Gridcoin with this release are now on a very sound and maintainable footing, and the developers believe the codebase as updated here will serve as the fundamental basis for Gridcoin's future roadmap.
We have been testing this for MONTHS on testnet in various stages. The v10 (legacy) compatibility code has been running on testnet continuously as it was developed to ensure compatibility with existing nodes. During the last few months, we have done two private testnet forks and then the full public testnet testing for v11 code (the new protocol which is what Fern implements). The developers have also been running non-staking "sentinel" nodes on mainnet with this code to verify that the consensus rules are problem-free for the legacy compatibility code on the broader mainnet. We believe this amount of testing is going to result in a smooth rollout.
Given the amount of changes in Fern, I am presenting TWO changelogs below. One is high level, which summarizes the most significant changes in the protocol. The second changelog is the detailed one in the usual format, and gives you an inkling of the size of this release.

Highlights

Protocol

Note that the protocol changes will not become active until we cross the hard-fork transition height to v11, which has been set at 2053000. Given current average block spacing, this should happen around October 4, about one month from now.
Note that to get all of the beacons in the network on the new protocol, we are requiring ALL beacons to be validated. A two week (14 day) grace period is provided by the code, starting at the time of the transition height, for people currently holding a beacon to validate the beacon and prevent it from expiring. That means that EVERY CRUNCHER must advertise and validate their beacon AFTER the v11 transition (around Oct 4th) and BEFORE October 18th (or more precisely, 14 days from the actual date of the v11 transition). If you do not advertise and validate your beacon by this time, your beacon will expire and you will stop earning research rewards until you advertise and validate a new beacon. This process has been made much easier by a brand new beacon "wizard" that helps manage beacon advertisements and renewals. Once a beacon has been validated and is a v11 protocol beacon, the normal 180 day expiration rules apply. Note, however, that the 180 day expiration on research rewards has been removed with the Fern update. This means that while your beacon might expire after 180 days, your earned research rewards will be retained and can be claimed by advertising a beacon with the same CPID and going through the validation process again. In other words, you do not lose any earned research rewards if you do not stake a block within 180 days and keep your beacon up-to-date.
The transition height is also when the team requirement will be relaxed for the network.

GUI

Besides the beacon wizard, there are a number of improvements to the GUI, including new UI transaction types (and icons) for staking the superblock, sidestake sends, beacon advertisement, voting, poll creation, and transactions with a message. The main screen has been revamped with a better summary section, and better status icons. Several changes under the hood have improved GUI performance. And finally, the diagnostics have been revamped.

Blockchain

The wallet sync speed has been DRASTICALLY improved. A decent machine with a good network connection should be able to sync the entire mainnet blockchain in less than 4 hours. A fast machine with a really fast network connection and a good SSD can do it in about 2.5 hours. One of our goals was to reduce or eliminate the reliance on snapshots for mainnet, and I think we have accomplished that goal with the new sync speed. We have also streamlined the in-memory structures for the blockchain which shaves some memory use.
There are so many goodies here it is hard to summarize them all.
I would like to thank all of the contributors to this release, but especially thank @cyrossignol, whose incredible contributions formed the backbone of this release. I would also like to pay special thanks to @barton2526, @caraka, and @Quezacoatl1, who tirelessly helped during the testing and polishing phase on testnet with testing and repeated builds for all architectures.
The developers are proud to present this release to the community and we believe this represents the starting point for a true renaissance for Gridcoin!

Summary Changelog

Accrual

Changed

Most significantly, nodes calculate research rewards directly from the magnitudes in EACH superblock between stakes instead of using a two- or three- point average based on a CPID's current magnitude and the magnitude for the CPID when it last staked. For those long-timers in the community, this has been referred to as "Superblock Windows," and was first done in proof-of-concept form by @denravonska.

Removed

Beacons

Added

Changed

Removed

Unaltered

As a reminder:

Superblocks

Added

Changed

Removed

Voting

Added

Changed

Removed

Detailed Changelog

[5.0.0.0] 2020-09-03, mandatory, "Fern"

Added

Changed

Removed

Fixed

submitted by jamescowens to gridcoin [link] [comments]

Bitcoin-qt datadir alternative storage location

I tried asking this in the bitcoincore sub yesterday, but it only has a handful of members and got no answers, so i now try here.
When bitcoin-qt is first started, it asks for the location of datadir. If it is set to a custom location, it remembers it on subsequent launches. Where is this location stored, as no bitcoin.conf is generated in the default location, and i have not seen any other documentation to specify datadir except command line option and bitcoin.conf file?
submitted by varikonniemi to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Power of the Command Line (bitcoin-cli, hwi, electrum, trezorctl)

I think some of the console tools available with HW wallets today are greatly under utilized. Here's a quick write-up on how to create and sign a TXN very similar to 43d27...1fc06 found on the SLIP-14 wallet. I'll be using TrezorCTL, Electrum, and HWI for the signing. I won't go much into the setup or install, but feel free to ask if you have questions about it. Note, you don't have to use all three of these. Any one will produce a valid signed TXN for broadcast. I just showed how to do it three ways. Whats more some of the Electrum and HWI steps are interchangeable.

TrezorCTL

This is the what most would think of to use to craft and sign TXNs, and is definitely very simple. The signing uses a script called build_tx.py to create a JSON file that is then used by the btc sign-tx command. The whole process is basically:
  1. tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
This just means, take the output of build_tx and sign it. To copy 43d27...1fc06, I wrote a small script to feed build_tx, so my process looks like:
  1. ~/input.sh | tools/build_tx.py | trezorctl btc sign-tx -
But it's all very simple. Note... I used TrezorCTL v0.12.2 but build_tx.py version 0.13.0 1.

input.sh

```

!/bin/bash

secho() { sleep 1; echo $*}
secho "Testnet" # coin name secho "tbtc1.trezor.io" # blockbook server and outpoint (below) secho "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00:0" secho "m/84'/1'/0'/0/0" # prev_out derivation to signing key secho "4294967293" # Sequence for RBF; hex(-3) secho "segwit" # Signature type on prev_out to use secho "" # NACK to progress to outs secho "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3" # out[0].addr secho "10000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu" # out[1].addr secho "20000000" # out[1].amt secho "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x" # out[2].addr secho "99999694" # out[2].amt secho "" # NACK to progress to change secho "" # NACK to skip change secho "2" # txn.version secho "0" # txn.locktime ```

Electrum

Electrum is one of the better GUI wallets available, but it also has a pretty good console interface. Like before you need your Trezor with the SLIP-14 wallet loaded and paired to Electrum. I'll assume Electrum is up and running with the Trezor wallet loaded to make things simple.
Like with TrezorCTL, Electrum feeds on a JSON file, but unlike TrezorCTL it needs that JSON squished into the command line. This is a simple sed command, but I won't bore you with the details, but just assume that's done. So the process in Electrum (v4.0.3) looks like:
  1. electrum serialize (create psbt to sign)
  2. electrum --wallet signtransaction (sign said psbt)
Still pretty simple right! Below is the JSON I smushed for #1

txn.json

{ "inputs": [{ "prevout_hash":"e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "prevout_n": 0, "value_sats": 129999867 }], "outputs": [{ "address": "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3", "value_sats": 10000000 },{ "address": "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu", "value_sats": 20000000 },{ "address": "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x", "value_sats": 99999694 }]}

HWI

HWI is an unsung hero in my book. It's a very small clean and simple interface between HW wallets and Bitcoin Core. It currently supports a good range of HW wallets. It keeps itself narrowly focused on TXN signing and offloads most everything else to Bitcoin Core. Again, I'll assume you've imported your Trezor keypool into Core and done the requisite IBD and rescan. And if you don't have the RPC enabled, you can always clone these commands into the QT-console.
To sign our TXN in HWI (v1.1.2), we will first need to craft (and finalize) it in Bitcoin Core (0.21.1). Like in Electrum, we will have to use simple sed to smush some JSON into command arguments, but I'll assume you have that covered. It will take an inputs.json and an outputs.json named separately.
  1. bitcoin-cli createpsbt (create psbt)
  2. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= walletprocesspsbt (process psbt)
  3. hwi -f signtx (sign psbt)
  4. bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet= finalizepsbt (get a signed TXN from psbt)
A little more involved, but still nothing too bad. Plus this gives you the full power of Bitcoin Core including integrations with LND (lightning).

inputs.json

[{ "txid": "e294c4c172c3d87991b0369e45d6af8584be92914d01e3060fad1ed31d12ff00", "vout": 0 }]

outputs.json

[{ "2MsiAgG5LVDmnmJUPnYaCeQnARWGbGSVnr3": 0.10000000 },{ "tb1q9l0rk0gkgn73d0gc57qn3t3cwvucaj3h8wtrlu": 0.20000000 },{ "tb1qejqxwzfld7zr6mf7ygqy5s5se5xq7vmt96jk9x": 0.99999694 }]

Conclusion

This may all seem like very low level coding, but is surprisingly simple once you get a knack for it. Whats more, all these platforms support testnet which allows you to practice with valueless coins until you get the hang of it. And, like many things in bitcoin, this is all (mostly) python, which is one of the easier languages to learn.
Enjoy
Footnotes
1 - https://github.com/trezotrezor-firmware/issues/1296
submitted by brianddk to TREZOR [link] [comments]

How-to: setup your multisignature Cold wallet in Bitcoin Core 0.20 (highest security setup)

Last release of Core is amazing !
The main new feature is sortedmulti descriptor. This allows you to import your multisig setup in Core almost as if it was Electrum when combine to the new PSBT export in GUI !
As it needs command line and some weird checksum, you also need to input very long command in the console and if you made a mistake, you cannot copy the last command you made. So take your time when the commands are long to check everything and don't miss anything, use copy paste before validating the long command. You only have to do this once fortunately :)
I detail here how you do it with a k of n setup, good luck:
And you are DONE ! You should get the exact same addresses than Electrum and you can created receiving addresses in Qt ! To send money, just go to the send section, use the new coin control feature and export a partially signed transaction. You can use HWI or Electrum to sign it with your hardware wallets !
Notice: You can import more or less than 2000 addresses of each type. If less, blockchain rescan is faster but you may need to redo what we have done here later when all addresses will have been used once. If more, it is the contrary.

You now have the most possibly secure setup in one software: multisig with hardware on the full node wallet. When Bitcoin Core 0.21.0 will be out, we will also have native descriptor wallet so maybe we will have HD version of this. But for now, this is the best you can do ! Enjoy :)

P.S. : if you like doing things in one shot you can do the last two steps in one big command: importmulti '[{"desc": "wsh(sortedmulti(k,[path1]xpub1.../0/*,[path2]xpub2.../0/*,...,[pathn]xpubn/0/*))#check_sum0", "timestamp": birth_timestamp, "range": [0,2000], "watchonly": true, "keypool": true}, {"desc": "wsh(sortedmulti(k,[path1]xpub1.../1/*,[path2]xpub2.../1/*,...,[pathn]xpubn/1/*))#check_sum1", "timestamp": birth_timestamp, "range": [0,2000], "watchonly": true, "internal": true}]'
submitted by Pantamis to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What does "bin/bitcoin-wallet" and other binaries do?

I'm old, and haven't run Bitcoin Core since the 80's, when it was just bitcoind and bitcon-qt.
Can someone tell me what these files are and what they do, because a) they're not mentioned in the readme.md, and b) Google is absolutely useless for searches like "bin/bitcoin-wallet", returning patronising results like "What is a bitcoin wallet?"
bin/bitcoin-cli // command-line bitcoin client bin/bitcoind // bitcoin daemon bin/bitcoin-qt // gui client bin/bitcoin-tx // ?? bin/bitcoin-wallet // ?????? 
Thanks.
submitted by textreply to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How To Stake/Mine Coinevo

EVO Staking/Evo mining

Evo uses Proof of Stake consensus mechanism, which is different from Bitcoin's PoW (Proof of Work). Evo mining process in PoS system is called staking. The block producer will get 6.5EVO, as well as the transaction fees and gases as block reward. So the real reward is usually more than 6.5 evo in total.
Basic requirements for staking:
  1. Run a Coinevo fullnode, and keep online (Since Coinevo is using PoS, we don't need any mining machine, just PC or even Raspberry Pi can run a fullnode);
  2. Have some EVO in the wallet (fullnode)(Any amount of EVO can be used for staking, more EVO means higher possibility to stake).
If you have no EVO yet, please get some from market before you doing following staking settings.
Currently, Coinevo Core wallet is the only wallet that support Coinevo PoS staking. Note that other wallets like mobile wallet and Evo Electrum are not able to stake for the time being.
Two ways to stake:
Either way works in the same way for staking, so you can choose either method you like.

Method 1:Staking with evod (command line)

1. Run evod

Follow the guidance to run evod :
./evod -daemon 
Staking is default on for evod, so no need for other options if you only want to stake.

2. Send some EVO to your wallet

First you can generate a new address with:
./evo-cli getnewaddress 
This will generate a new address with Prefix '1'. You can send some EVO to this new generated address for staking. You can generate as many addresses as you like, and send arbitrary EVO as you like for staking.
Note:The coin should wait for 500 blocks before being able to stake, i.e. about 17 to 24 hours to MATURE..
After the EVO node syncing to the latest block, you can check current balance with ./evo-cli getbalance or get utxo list with./evo-cli listunspent
Please do following steps after your coin is mature.

3. Check staking info

Check current staking info with:
./evo-cli getstakinginfo 
You might get the result like this:
{ "enabled": true, "staking": true, "errors": "", "currentblocktx": 0, "pooledtx": 0, "difficulty": 3693409.779133397, "search-interval": 1577, "weight": 309584575558555, "netstakeweight": 1948540143266404, "expectedtime": 805 } 
enabled means if your wallet have enabled staking, it should be true by default. staking means if your wallet is currently staking (mining). weight stands for the amount of EVO that is staking right now, with unit 10^-8EVO, here in the example, we have 0.532EVO staking. expectedtime stands for the expected time that you will get a reward, the unit is second.

4. How to stake if the wallet is encrypted?

If your wallet is not encrypted, you can skip this section. However, for security, we recommand you encrypt your wallet.
Coinevo wallet can be encrypted with encryptwallet . However, staking will be stopped when it is encrypted. For example, ./evo-cli getstakinginfo for a encrypted wallet:
{ "enabled": true, "staking": false, "errors": "", "currentblocksize": 1000, "currentblocktx": 0, "pooledtx": 94, "difficulty": 5788429.670171153, "search-interval": 0, "weight": 53206430, "netstakeweight": 2438496688951881, "expectedtime": 0 } 
See staking turns to false , which means wallet is not staking.
You can use walletpassphrase to unlock wallet for staking:
./evo-cli walletpassphrase "" 99999999 true 
After unlocking, you can double check getstakinginfo , it should look the same with previous unlocked result, staking become true.

Method 2: Staking with evo-qt wallet (official PC wallet)

Current supported platform: Mac/Linux/Windows.

1. Open Evo qt wallet

Launch the wallet.

2. Send some EVO to your wallet

If you already have some EVO in your wallet, you might skip this step.
Note:The coin should wait for 500 blocks before being able to stake, i.e. about 17 to 24 hours to MATURE..

3. Check staking status

The flash sign at the bottom of wallet shows staking info :
Solid black flash means it is staking now. For more information, you can put your mouse on the flash, e.g.:
Hollow flash measn it is not staking
Possible reasons for not staking:
No flash sign means staking is disabled

About block reward

The block producer will get more than 6.5 EVO rewards, something to keep in mind:

How to disable staking?

Staking is by default enabled for Coinevo wallet. If you need to disable staking for some reason (for example exchanges are always recommanded to disable staking), you might following anyone of the 3 ways below:
1 Add -staking=false when running Coinevo node:
./evod -staking=false -daemon 
For qt wallet, it is like:
./evo-qt -staking=false 
2 Add config staking=false in evo.conf;
3 Encrypt wallet, since encrypted wallet will automatically stop staking.
submitted by coinevo to u/coinevo [link] [comments]

Help: Bitcoin Core does not auto start in Ubuntu with -datadir option

Please can someone help me out?
I have installed Ubuntu in VirtualBox to host Bitcoin Core. In VirtualBox I assigned a special disk with the blockchain. I am however new to Ubuntu. I am a Windows crack.
When I start bitcoin core from a terminal command prompt like:
bitcoin-qt -datadir=/media//Blockchain
then Bitcoin core starts correctly. "" is my username to login to Ubuntu. "Blockchain" is how the disk is named in VirtualBox. The host system is Windows 10.
However when I configure this command in the 'startup applications' of Ubuntu to start bitcoin core automatically when Ubuntu starts, I get the error message the path cannot be found.
While I am writing this post, I think it may be possible Ubuntu did not logged me in under username yet when auto starting bitcoin core, but this is a wild quess.
Is there an Ubuntu crack who can help me out please?
submitted by pdlvw to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Creamcoin 0.18.0.0 – following Bitcoin’s tale

Creamcoin 0.18.0.0 – following Bitcoin’s tale

06/08/2019 3 min read📷216SHARES216VIEWSShare on Twitter
When new Creamcoin was designed, we had in mind not only a coin that would hold parity with any cryptocurrency, but something that would demonstrate the extra-special capabilities of a decentralized ledger, capable to introduce, help and bring it further to the regular people. Blockchain developing is unstoppable complex process with endless possibilities. Integration of applications on such a technology could achieve better, secure pass of value.
0.18.0.0

On August 5th, 2019 Creamcoin code was successfully updated to the latest Bitcoin version 0.18.0
https://github.com/creamcoin/cream/
With this latest release, we proved that Creamcoin itself it’s not a sort of a tenant to the Bitcoin. Much easier to apply and to pursue the main purpose of existence and to create further innovations in our Cream Line. The new release brings tremendous performance improvements, as well as integration will be much easier for any platform, exchange or integrator. Wallets are available to Releases tab on github
WALLETS

Multi-wallet support

Cream Core now supports loading multiple, separate wallets. The wallets are completely separated, with individual balances, keys and received transactions. Multi-wallet is enabled by using more than one -wallet argument when starting Creamcoin, either on the command line or in the Cream config file. In Creamcoin-Qt, only the first wallet will be displayed and accessible for creating and signing transactions. GUI selectable multiple wallets will be supported in a future version. This feature will continue to be refined with later updates, as there are still some known issues in using the GUI to access the “multiwallet” command. The most notable is that you can’t use coin control features with multiple wallets loaded, or else you will likely retain the wrong wallet when attempting to switch wallets.
When running Cream Core with multi-wallet, wallet-level RPC methods must specify the wallet for which they’re intended in every request. HTTP RPC requests should be send to the :/wallet// endpoint, for example 127.0.0.1:8332/wallet/wallet1.dat/. bitcoin-cli commands should be run with a -rpcwallet option, for example [bitcoin-cli -rpcwallet=wallet1.dat getbalance] A new node-level [listwallets] RPC method is added to display which wallets are currently loaded. Starting command for both wallets should look like this: [creamd -daemon -wallet=wallet1.dat -wallet=wallet2.dat]

Hardware Wallet native compatibility

With a new release of Cream Core the possibility is added in the form of use hardware wallets (Ledger, Trezor, Digital BitBox, KeepKey, Coldcard), but this process is manual and involves the use of Hardware Wallet Interaction (HWI) tool and it needs HW support and addition of Cream in the future, which is not excluded from roadmap. This is a great news for everyone who use Cream Core, and want extra security. Only applies to those who can use command line/CLI (for now), and when some of Hardware wallets actually supports Cream.

SegWit 4MB limit

SegWit replacing the block size limit with a block “weight” limit, allowing up to 4 megabytes of transaction data, and giving a substantial boost in the transaction capacity of the Cream network.

www.creamcoin.com

In the same with the new code update, Creamcoin Team is doing major shifting power, migrating the marketing and promotion activities, from our news site cream.technology to our main page www.creamcoin.com. We will come up with additional statement in this matter, so our supporters and followers have better perspective of Cream Line and the products of it.
In the meantime we are looking into new ways that developers can enhance the capabilities of the Creamcoin protocol, integration of decentralized exchange functionality, lightning network and number of other options that would allow for different types of conditional sends of Creamcoin assets. We are inviting any individual, platform, exchange or integrator who would like to submit recommendations or feature requests, feel free to contribute to the Creamcoin Github.
By Cream Team
submitted by creamcointeam to u/creamcointeam [link] [comments]

Groestlcoin 6th Anniversary Release

Introduction

Dear Groestlers, it goes without saying that 2020 has been a difficult time for millions of people worldwide. The groestlcoin team would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone our best to everyone coping with the direct and indirect effects of COVID-19. Let it bring out the best in us all and show that collectively, we can conquer anything.
The centralised banks and our national governments are facing unprecedented times with interest rates worldwide dropping to record lows in places. Rest assured that this can only strengthen the fundamentals of all decentralised cryptocurrencies and the vision that was seeded with Satoshi's Bitcoin whitepaper over 10 years ago. Despite everything that has been thrown at us this year, the show must go on and the team will still progress and advance to continue the momentum that we have developed over the past 6 years.
In addition to this, we'd like to remind you all that this is Groestlcoin's 6th Birthday release! In terms of price there have been some crazy highs and lows over the years (with highs of around $2.60 and lows of $0.000077!), but in terms of value– Groestlcoin just keeps getting more valuable! In these uncertain times, one thing remains clear – Groestlcoin will keep going and keep innovating regardless. On with what has been worked on and completed over the past few months.

UPDATED - Groestlcoin Core 2.18.2

This is a major release of Groestlcoin Core with many protocol level improvements and code optimizations, featuring the technical equivalent of Bitcoin v0.18.2 but with Groestlcoin-specific patches. On a general level, most of what is new is a new 'Groestlcoin-wallet' tool which is now distributed alongside Groestlcoin Core's other executables.
NOTE: The 'Account' API has been removed from this version which was typically used in some tip bots. Please ensure you check the release notes from 2.17.2 for details on replacing this functionality.

How to Upgrade?

Windows
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the installer.
OSX
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), run the dmg and drag Groestlcoin Core to Applications.
Ubuntu
http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=441.0

Other Linux

http://groestlcoin.org/forum/index.php?topic=97.0

Download

Download the Windows Installer (64 bit) here
Download the Windows Installer (32 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Windows binaries (32 bit) here
Download the OSX Installer here
Download the OSX binaries here
Download the Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the Linux binaries (32 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (64 bit) here
Download the ARM Linux binaries (32 bit) here

Source

ALL NEW - Groestlcoin Moonshine iOS/Android Wallet

Built with React Native, Moonshine utilizes Electrum-GRS's JSON-RPC methods to interact with the Groestlcoin network.
GRS Moonshine's intended use is as a hot wallet. Meaning, your keys are only as safe as the device you install this wallet on. As with any hot wallet, please ensure that you keep only a small, responsible amount of Groestlcoin on it at any given time.

Features

Download

iOS
Android

Source

ALL NEW! – HODL GRS Android Wallet

HODL GRS connects directly to the Groestlcoin network using SPV mode and doesn't rely on servers that can be hacked or disabled.
HODL GRS utilizes AES hardware encryption, app sandboxing, and the latest security features to protect users from malware, browser security holes, and even physical theft. Private keys are stored only in the secure enclave of the user's phone, inaccessible to anyone other than the user.
Simplicity and ease-of-use is the core design principle of HODL GRS. A simple recovery phrase (which we call a Backup Recovery Key) is all that is needed to restore the user's wallet if they ever lose or replace their device. HODL GRS is deterministic, which means the user's balance and transaction history can be recovered just from the backup recovery key.

Features

Download

Main Release (Main Net)
Testnet Release

Source

ALL NEW! – GroestlcoinSeed Savior

Groestlcoin Seed Savior is a tool for recovering BIP39 seed phrases.
This tool is meant to help users with recovering a slightly incorrect Groestlcoin mnemonic phrase (AKA backup or seed). You can enter an existing BIP39 mnemonic and get derived addresses in various formats.
To find out if one of the suggested addresses is the right one, you can click on the suggested address to check the address' transaction history on a block explorer.

Features

Live Version (Not Recommended)

https://www.groestlcoin.org/recovery/

Download

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/mnemonic-recovery/archive/master.zip

Source

ALL NEW! – Vanity Search Vanity Address Generator

NOTE: NVidia GPU or any CPU only. AMD graphics cards will not work with this address generator.
VanitySearch is a command-line Segwit-capable vanity Groestlcoin address generator. Add unique flair when you tell people to send Groestlcoin. Alternatively, VanitySearch can be used to generate random addresses offline.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic addresses generated by regular groestlcoin clients, then VanitySearch is the right choice for you to create a more personalized address.
VanitySearch is a groestlcoin address prefix finder. If you want to generate safe private keys, use the -s option to enter your passphrase which will be used for generating a base key as for BIP38 standard (VanitySearch.exe -s "My PassPhrase" FXPref). You can also use VanitySearch.exe -ps "My PassPhrase" which will add a crypto secure seed to your passphrase.
VanitySearch may not compute a good grid size for your GPU, so try different values using -g option in order to get the best performances. If you want to use GPUs and CPUs together, you may have best performances by keeping one CPU core for handling GPU(s)/CPU exchanges (use -t option to set the number of CPU threads).

Features

Usage

https://github.com/Groestlcoin/VanitySearch#usage

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020

Groestlcoin EasyVanity 2020 is a windows app built from the ground-up and makes it easier than ever before to create your very own bespoke bech32 address(es) when whilst not connected to the internet.
If you're tired of the random, cryptic bech32 addresses generated by regular Groestlcoin clients, then Groestlcoin EasyVanity2020 is the right choice for you to create a more personalised bech32 address. This 2020 version uses the new VanitySearch to generate not only legacy addresses (F prefix) but also Bech32 addresses (grs1 prefix).

Features

Download

Source

Remastered! – Groestlcoin WPF Desktop Wallet (v2.19.0.18)

Groestlcoin WPF is an alternative full node client with optional lightweight 'thin-client' mode based on WPF. Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is one of Microsoft's latest approaches to a GUI framework, used with the .NET framework. Its main advantages over the original Groestlcoin client include support for exporting blockchain.dat and including a lite wallet mode.
This wallet was previously deprecated but has been brought back to life with modern standards.

Features

Remastered Improvements

Download

Source

ALL NEW! – BIP39 Key Tool

Groestlcoin BIP39 Key Tool is a GUI interface for generating Groestlcoin public and private keys. It is a standalone tool which can be used offline.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux :
 pip3 install -r requirements.txt python3 bip39\_gui.py 

Source

ALL NEW! – Electrum Personal Server

Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server aims to make using Electrum Groestlcoin wallet more secure and more private. It makes it easy to connect your Electrum-GRS wallet to your own full node.
It is an implementation of the Electrum-grs server protocol which fulfils the specific need of using the Electrum-grs wallet backed by a full node, but without the heavyweight server backend, for a single user. It allows the user to benefit from all Groestlcoin Core's resource-saving features like pruning, blocks only and disabled txindex. All Electrum-GRS's feature-richness like hardware wallet integration, multi-signature wallets, offline signing, seed recovery phrases, coin control and so on can still be used, but connected only to the user's own full node.
Full node wallets are important in Groestlcoin because they are a big part of what makes the system be trust-less. No longer do people have to trust a financial institution like a bank or PayPal, they can run software on their own computers. If Groestlcoin is digital gold, then a full node wallet is your own personal goldsmith who checks for you that received payments are genuine.
Full node wallets are also important for privacy. Using Electrum-GRS under default configuration requires it to send (hashes of) all your Groestlcoin addresses to some server. That server can then easily spy on your transactions. Full node wallets like Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server would download the entire blockchain and scan it for the user's own addresses, and therefore don't reveal to anyone else which Groestlcoin addresses they are interested in.
Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can also broadcast transactions through Tor which improves privacy by resisting traffic analysis for broadcasted transactions which can link the IP address of the user to the transaction. If enabled this would happen transparently whenever the user simply clicks "Send" on a transaction in Electrum-grs wallet.
Note: Currently Groestlcoin Electrum Personal Server can only accept one connection at a time.

Features

Download

Windows
Linux / OSX (Instructions)

Source

UPDATED – Android Wallet 7.38.1 - Main Net + Test Net

The app allows you to send and receive Groestlcoin on your device using QR codes and URI links.
When using this app, please back up your wallet and email them to yourself! This will save your wallet in a password protected file. Then your coins can be retrieved even if you lose your phone.

Changes

Download

Main Net
Main Net (FDroid)
Test Net

Source

UPDATED – Groestlcoin Sentinel 3.5.06 (Android)

Groestlcoin Sentinel is a great solution for anyone who wants the convenience and utility of a hot wallet for receiving payments directly into their cold storage (or hardware wallets).
Sentinel accepts XPUB's, YPUB'S, ZPUB's and individual Groestlcoin address. Once added you will be able to view balances, view transactions, and (in the case of XPUB's, YPUB's and ZPUB's) deterministically generate addresses for that wallet.
Groestlcoin Sentinel is a fork of Groestlcoin Samourai Wallet with all spending and transaction building code removed.

Changes

Download

Source

UPDATED – P2Pool Test Net

Changes

Download

Pre-Hosted Testnet P2Pool is available via http://testp2pool.groestlcoin.org:21330/static/

Source

submitted by Yokomoko_Saleen to groestlcoin [link] [comments]

How to get Energi Wallet running on Raspberry Pi 4

How to get Energi Wallet running on Raspberry Pi 4
Hello,
I'm new to the Raspberry Pi and trying to get the NRG Core Cryptocurrency wallet running on my Raspberry. Finally I was able to compile the files after this commands:
Download and install the newest updates sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade
Install the following major dependencies packages sudo apt-get install git build-essential libtool autotools-dev autoconf pkg-config libssl-dev libcrypto++-dev libevent-dev libminiupnpc-dev libgmp-dev libboost-all-dev devscripts libdb++-dev libsodium-dev
Install the following QT dependencies packages sudo apt-get install libqt5gui5 libqt5core5a libqt5dbus5 qttools5-dev qttools5-dev-tools libprotobuf-dev protobuf-compiler libcrypto++-dev libminiupnpc-dev qt5-default
Install bitcoin PPA files cd /etc/apt/sources.list.d/
sudo nano bitcoin.list
Add this line to the file: deb-src http://ppa.launchpad.net/bitcoin/bitcoin/ubuntu artful main
Close file
sudo apt-key adv --keyserver hkp://keyserver.ubuntu.com:80 --recv C70EF1F0305A1ADB9986DBD8D46F45428842CE5E
sudo apt-get update
Clone Github cd git clone https://github.com/energicryptocurrency/energi.git
Install Libdb4.8 Libdb4.8-dev Libdb++ Libdb4.8++-dev
Compile the wallet cd energi ./autogen.sh ./configure --with-boost-libdir=/uslib/arm-linux-gnueabihf make sudo make install
After compiling I see the files in /uslocal/bin
https://preview.redd.it/25m1nm8164k41.jpg?width=2016&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=3dfec55b307187eea06a279e284a19a6ae5d6d37
No I need to know how to use this files? Can someone help me please?
submitted by FCU4ever to energicryptocurrency [link] [comments]

Issue upgrading my bitcoin node

Hello,
I'm trying to update my current node (v0.18.1.0). I'm running my node on Mac using an external HD.
Everything is on my HD except for the bitcoin.conf file and the Bitcoin Core icon in my Applications folder.
I was able to launch my node using the icon on my Application folder (bitcoin-qt) or using the command line (bitcoind)
Since I downloaded the new version (v0.19.0.1), I have the following issue:
When I launch my node using the icon on my Application folder (bitcoin-qt) everything is fine and the new version is running (using the data in my external HD), but when launch the node using the command line (bitcoind), it still launch the old version.
Is there a separate update from bitcoind? I've done some research online but I didn't find anything helpful.
Thank You!!!
***EDIT***
I have downloaded "bitcoin-0.19.0.1-osx64.tar.gz" which include the executable for bitcoind, bitcoin-cli, etc and replace the old ones by the new ones and everything looks fine!
submitted by germmmmmm to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Running eclair with bitcoin-qt. (Ubuntu)

Trying to get eclair (lightning serveapp gui) to run and having issues. Seems I need to run qt in server mode so it can run the RPC server. Doing this in the command line however launches Bitcoin qt again and it attempts to reindex the whole blockchain (even though it's run from same location)... What am I doing wrong?
Interested also if anyone is running qt on Ubuntu and also attempting to experiment with lightning ...tips tricks etc..
submitted by hungdoge to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can electrum do multisig from a WIF private key instead of a 24 word seed.

I used to do this in bitcoin-qt.
Say I have bitcoin address addrA that is included as one of the addresses in a 2 of 3 multisig address msAddr. Now if I have the WIF private key for addrA and a partially signed TXN psTxn from msAddr with one of the 3 signatures already attached, is there a way in electrum for me to attach an addrA signature to psTxn?
By "any way" I mean gui clicks, command-line commands or electrum-console scripts.
PS, I also have the requisite redeem script
submitted by brianddk to Electrum [link] [comments]

Bitcoin stuck on broken wallet

I keep my bitcoin on a wallet on my Linux partition; recently, it failed to synchronize. I've tried sending a small test transaction to a wallet I have on my Windows partition; but the transaction never arrived.
Is there any way to access my bitcoin from my Windows wallet, without needing to send it over in the form of a transaction?
submitted by ElenTheMellon to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

BittyTax - New open source project for cryptoasset accounting/audit/tax tools

BittyTax - New open source project for cryptoasset accounting/audit/tax tools

BittyTax
I wrote this code last year to do my own tax return as at the time there was nothing available for UK tax rules. I decided to make it open source here https://github.com/BittyTax/BittyTax.
It’s command line tools only at the moment, but I’m working on next version which will integrate directly into Excel to make it a bit easier to use.
I've done a lot of testing and some friends have used it for their tax returns, but bear in mind it is still in beta.
If you get any problems or there's any feature you would like added, please raise an issue here.
It currently handles these data file formats:
Wallets:
  • Electrum
  • Ledger Live
  • Qt Wallet (i.e. Bitcoin Core)
  • Trezor
Exchanges:
  • Binance
  • Bitstamp
  • Bittrex
  • ChangeTip
  • Circle
  • Coinbase
  • Coinbase Pro
  • Coinfloor
  • Cryptopia
  • Cryptsy
  • Gatehub
  • OKEx
  • Poloniex
  • TradeSatoshi
  • Uphold
  • Wirex
Explorers:
  • Etherscan
Historic price data for fiat/crypto are taken from these sources:
submitted by nanonanouk to BitcoinUK [link] [comments]

Blocknet Linux Wallet Upgrade, Install or run Qt from Command Line

The simplest way to start from scratch with the command line client, automatically syncing blockchain and creating a wallet, is to just run this command (without arguments) from the directory containing your bitcoind binary: ./bitcoind To run with the standard GUI interface: ./bitcoin-qt Command-line arguments If it's QT: go to "Help" -> "Debug Window" -> "console" type rpc command here. Or go from the commandline to the folder your bitcoin daemon is in and run a command from the bitcoin exe. NOTE: you may need to add server=1 to your bitcoin.conf in %APPDATA% Command-line arguments These commands are accurate as of Bitcoin Core version v0.12.0rc1. Command Description -? This help message -alerts Receive and display P2P network alerts (default: 1) -alert… The simplest way to start from scratch with the command line client, automatically syncing blockchain and creating a wallet, is to just run this command (without arguments) from the directory containing your bitcoind binary: ./bitcoind To run with the standard GUI interface: ./bitcoin-qt Command-line arguments Bitcoind – a daemon program that implements the Bitcoin protocol, is controlled through the command line. It is one of the main components of the Bitcoin network node software. Bitcoin software exists in two forms: a GUI application and a background application (daemon on Unix, service on Windows).

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Blocknet Linux Wallet Upgrade, Install or run Qt from Command Line

This is a quick tutorial on how to upgrade or install the Blocknet wallet from the Linux Command Line. This is difficulty level of easy to moderate depending upon your comfort with the command ...

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